Bookmaking

Publishing their work for an audience helps children to write more purposefully. Bookmaking provides a motivating context within which children can bring together their developing understanding of what written language is like; making written language meaningful as they construct their own texts. The decisions that all writers have to take and the processes of redrafting, editing and punctuation can be demonstrated and discussed as teachers and children write together in shared writing.

Children should be encouraged to explore and experiment with the language of picture books by investigating different forms, for example interactive books with pop-ups and flaps, hardback books with dustjackets and e-books. The work and books of Paul Johnson (http://www.bookart.co.uk/) give a wealth of ideas for a range of book making projects for children.

Publishing their work for an audience helps children to write more purposefully. Bookmaking provides a motivating context within which children can bring together their developing understanding of what written language is like; making written language meaningful as they construct their own texts. The decisions that all writers have to take and the processes of redrafting, editing and punctuation can be demonstrated and discussed as teachers and children write together in shared writing.

Children should be encouraged to explore and experiment with the language of picture books by investigating different forms, for example interactive books with pop-ups and flaps, hardback books with dustjackets and e-books. The work and books of Paul Johnson (http://www.bookart.co.uk/) give a wealth of ideas for a range of book making projects for children.

Interactive elements
Children can add to the reader’s engagement with the text and characters by having interactive elements within their picturebook such as flaps to lift, pages that open out, cut out parts and pop-ups. It is important that children try out and test their ideas to see how this will work for the reader before inserting into their finished book. This is as important as drafting, re-drafting and editing their writing.

Making dummy and finished books
Many authors will make a dummy book as part of their writing process. This is a small sized or full scale version, which gives the author a truer sense of the physical reality and experience of the finished book. Illustrations will often be roughs; sketches of spreads without huge detail or colour. Text boxes might appear instead of the full text. Making a dummy book is an essential part of the re-drafting process, after storyboarding ideas, as it allows the children a much greater idea of what the finished text will look like and how it works for the reader. There are many ways of making dummy and finished books to draft and publish children’s own picturebooks.

Basic origami book
This can be made from either A3, A2 or larger paper. One sheet will make an eight page book.  You can make multiple books and glue them together to make longer books.

PDF icon How to make a basic origami book.pdf

A dustjacketed book 
For this, you will need two sheets of at least A2 sized paper. You can make multiple sets of the inner pages and glue them together to make longer books.

PDF icon How to make a dustjacketed book.pdf

A Sewn Book:

PDF icon How to make a Sewn Book by Paul Johnson.pdf

E-books
There are a now a number of sites that allow children to view and make e-books. A good e-book should not interrupt the flow of the narrative and should enhance the reader’s experience of reading. Ed Vere’s Bedtime for Monsters, one of the Power of Pictures texts, features on the Me Books app along with texts by Power of Pictures author David Lucas.

Through looking at what makes a quality e-book, in the same way as you would with a print book, children can also explore this as a publishing medium. There are apps and software available that are easily accessible and can support children in publishing in the e-book format.