The Minotaur

Poem from Falling Out of the Sky. Poems about Myths and Monsters by Piercey, Rachel and Wright, Emma

In the middle of a dark, dark maze
lived the monstrous Minotaur.

He ahd two sharp horns and fearsome teeth 
and a deep and horrible roar.

No one should have to go in there,
in the dark with that terrible beast

but fourteen youngmen and young women
were sent in for the monster to feast.

Then, with his sword, came Theseus,
who had heard of the young people's plight.

He promised to enter the Labyrinth
and challenge the fiend to a fight.

Ariadne, the King's clever daughter,
knew a sword wasn't enough,

getting into the maze would be easy,
but getting out again, that would be tough.

The Labyrinth was built to be tricky,
to bewilder and trap and mislead,

Ariadne knew Theseus needed her help
if his plan was to ever succeed.

So she gave him a ball of red-coloured string
and told him to use it with care,

to tie one end tight at the start of the maze
before entering the Minotaur's lair.

Round each darkened bend and each miserable pass
crept Theseus, sword in his hand,

and he unwound the string he'd been given,
as smart Ariadne had planned.

At last he came to the middle,
and the Minotaur came in to view,

and Theseus shaking but ready,
did what he promised to do.

He fought with the beast in the darkness,
till the Minotaur fell down dead,

and then Theseus retraced each step he had made,
following the line of the thread.

It takes more than a sword to slay monsters.
Without bravery a sword's just a thing,

and let's not forget Ariadne,
with her plan and her ball of red string.

 

Resources

Videos

Rachel Piercey - The Minotaur

The Minotaur